You should be presently hearing smooth music by Andreas Vollenweider

And why shouldn’t this site be useful also to young photographers?  Here is a trick that I often use to photograph a subject, in front of which I can hardly step back for lack of place (space). For instance here, in front of (less than two meters) a huge Egyptian statue that is more than 5 meters high. The Puzzle!


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Same thing with a big statue of the Greek Department in the Parisian Louvre: three shots were necessary to catch the woman and the whole statue from about two meters distance.

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Somewhere in Paris. Thousands of visitors come here every day (except on Mondays) and queue up in front of the gates of the building, surely one of the most beautiful Parisian museums.  Unfortunately, most of the people are not very curious, being satisfied with the (mostly poor) information on display in tourist guides. The fact is that would they dare to check the neighbourhood, they would surely discover at the back of the museum a narrow path, in the middle of which stand the huge silhouettes of two warriors carved by sculptor Pierre-Antoine Bourdelle, who has in another district of Paris a museum specially dedicated to his works.

Both statues are really big: at least 3.50 meters, and to get them on a single photograph you have to shoot them laterally, given the narrowness of the path. Of course, my intention was to have nothing, but a (single) front view of both warriors!

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orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle

As you can see, there are not more than two meters from the statues to the rail, and the purpose was to stand exactly between both statues, where the arrow shows 'O'. Given the situation there was only a possibility to realize the project: making a panoramic shot.

25 (x 2) different pictures in the form of a puzzle (x 2) covering the whole scene. Then a special software would merge the pieces of the (2) puzzle(s) into a single picture, actually two views, considering both eyes.

orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle orsay_paris_bourdelle
orsay_paris_bourdelle_3d
orsay_paris_bourdelle_3d
And now, both pictures are merged together into an anaglyph. Here we have a draft of what should be feasible, I mean with a better light, by sunny weather, because shadows enhance the 3D effect. Of course, you have noticed that the software (above) creates the illusion of perspective, with a simulation of an enlargement of the distance from the camera to the subject(s). Besides that, everything originally straight (in our eyes!) is now curved. Thus, a flat angle (180°) becomes an acute one, corresponding to the perception that we have of our environment (what is near looks bigger than what is far...), given the narrowness of our field of vision, and because cameras don't lie!
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