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Music by Jan Sibelius [2nd Symphony] (the composer of Finlandia and the Sad Waltz)

 

alegoria
At first sight you think: "Wow, what a mess!": surely the funniest mess I have ever seen on a painting! The painter should have been a little master of the 17. century and he managed to create an incredible mix based on three themes: two still lives (the one with food on the table, the second with broken plate and inverted crockery on the floor) and a sort of scene of the daily life with two characters put on a diagonal so as to balance all the mess. It's just crazy! I guess that three to four hours should be necessary to re-create the scene in 3D.
 

degas, 3d, stereo, relief, anaglyph, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, edgar, impressionnism, impressionnisme, musée, orsay, paris
He who loved dancers (girls!) so much! Edgar Degas. The whole series is gorgeous. Besides that Degas painted a lot of other masterpieces as L'Absinthe (on display on this website), and many scenes with horses ...
degas, 3d, stereo, relief, anaglyph, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, edgar, impressionnism, impressionnisme, musée, orsay, paris
degas, 3d, stereo, relief, anaglyph, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, edgar, impressionnism, impressionnisme, musée, orsay, paris
 

dancers
Another workshop with dancers, but this time not by Degas.

benoist
Joconde noire ? Black Gioconda? It is not the original title, but it is quite sure that Marie-Guillemine Benoist was inspired by Leonardo's Mona Lisa. Incidentally, what a boldness! Here, we have the first black character ever (*) at the very center of a painting and, it's a woman, with a naked breast! Much later Napoleon III loved the painting and bought it. This was my very first try to make a stereoscopic of it, and I remain unsatisfied. Here, you have almost the same problems as by Mona Lisa: there is not much perspective (even if you have that rocky - and not very interesting in my opinion - landscape behind Mona Lisa; here, you have also some perspective with the axis chair-arm-breast-head) but, besides that, you have that strong contrast between the white dress and the dark skin. The head is surely the most interesting part of the painting because of that look and the amazing headscarf: a specialty of the West Indies, where the woman surely came from.

(*) Correction: "black woman ever!" ... because of Girodet de Roussy-Trioson's 'Portrait du citoyen Belley,' 1797.
 

degas, 3d, stereo, relief, anaglyph, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, edgar, impressionnism, impressionnisme, musée, orsay, paris, claesz
Pieter Claesz surely belongs to the greatest European specialists of the Still Life, and what a Still Life! You recognize Claesz' style at first glance: it is just brilliant.
 

degas, 3d, stereo, relief, anaglyph, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, edgar, impressionnism, impressionnisme, musée, orsay, paris, caspar, david, friedrich
There are not plenty of great landscape painters, and it's a pity because the mastering of landscapes considerably enriches the work of an artist (cf. many landscapes by Braque, almost nothing by his alter ego Picasso) and, among the great masters of the landscape I admit having quite a particular tenderness for Caspar David Friedrich with his amazing German landscapes. From a technical point of view, to be honest, there is a great deal of work: each mountain is to be considered a unique character! By chance you have almost half of the painting occupied by the sky! As for the time, should we say between two and three hours to get a beautiful anaglyph?

assyr
Highlighting the relief of a bas-relief is not an easy job, but that's what makes it all the more exciting. The work is almost the same as with coins, the items (= pictures) being completely flat; as a result you must have some sense of imagination.
 

pferd
I discovered that British painter by sheer luck, and because I spent so many years at university searching for documents in the dusty drawers of so many libraries, what means that I am used to searching for documents! The painter's main works are dedicated to horses, which he paints often alone, in the middle of nowhere. Of course you know him, because he seems to be famous by horse lovers.

google, dna, 3d, anaglyph, stereo, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, relief
Putting the picture into 3D? I guess, ten hours or more would be necessary. Aha! A lot of people would surely ask: "3D DNA? Are you turning mad, brother?" But, why not putting DNA in 3D? Isn't it the very molecule to display in 3D? Anyway, that is going to remind me of the years at university to study molecular biology. At that time, we had two main heroes: Francis Crick and James Watson, discoverers of the double-helical structure of the DNA, what led them to the Nobel prize. And, then, a lot of years later, I learnt that somebody had been forgotten by the mainstream media, after being ignored by our 'heroes', somebody whose early death made possible that Crick and Watson have been for a long time thought of as the only discoverers of the double helix, what happened to be false; somebody whose works Crick, Watson and Wilkins could not ignore, although being swindlers because it is largely her researches, along with William Astbury, which facilitated the discovery of the double helix: Rosalind Franklin, whose name constitutes one of the biggest scandals of modern science. (Link)
google, dna, 3d, anaglyph, stereo, stereoscopy, stéréoscopie, relief

(RAP)